April 12, 2014

(Source: dubeton, via architectureofdoom)

April 12, 2014
mapsontheweb:

Percentage of Canadians in their twenties living with their parents, 2011

mapsontheweb:

Percentage of Canadians in their twenties living with their parents, 2011

April 10, 2014

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Loris Cecchini’s "Wallwave Vibration" series is strongly reminiscent of Faraday wave patterns. The Faraday instability occurs when a fluid interface (usually air-liquid though it can also be two immiscible liquids) is vibrated. Above a critical frequency, the flat interface becomes unstable and nonlinear standing waves form. If the excitation is strong enough, the instability can produce very chaotic behaviors, like tiny sprays of droplets or jets that shoot out like fountains. In a series of fluid-filled cells, the chaotic behaviors can even form synchronous effects above a certain vibration amplitude. (Image credit: L. Cecchini; submitted by buckitdrop)

(via femmeviva)

April 7, 2014

zerostatereflex:

Introducing large scale multi axis 3D printing in metal!

Pretty soon we’ll be 3D printing everything, perhaps even your house one day. 

(via peakcapitolism)

April 6, 2014
"If one day China should change her color and turn into a superpower, if she too should play the tyrant in the world, and everywhere subject others to her bullying, aggression and exploitation, the people of the world should identify her as social-imperialism, expose it, oppose it and work together with the Chinese people to overthrow it."

Deng Xiaoping’s speech at the United Nations, April 10, 1974 (via cadburycrazed)

(Source: toniiu, via utilitymaximiser)

April 6, 2014
"hot electrons, in an effort to get to cooler areas, are able to push the magnetic fence outward."

New Magnetic Mechanism Could Advance Fusion Power (via outofcontextscience)

I wonder if this is a consequence of the Onsager reciprocal relations?

(via femmeviva)

April 4, 2014
wildcat2030:

read of the day: A Fundamental Theory to Model the Mind - In 1999, the Danish physicist Per Bak proclaimed to a group of neuroscientists that it had taken him only 10 minutes to determine where the field had gone wrong. Perhaps the brain was less complicated than they thought, he said. Perhaps, he said, the brain worked on the same fundamental principles as a simple sand pile, in which avalanches of various sizes help keep the entire system stable overall — a process he dubbed “self-organized criticality.” As much as scientists in other fields adore outspoken, know-it-all physicists, Bak’s audacious idea — that the brain’s ordered complexity and thinking ability arise spontaneously from the disordered electrical activity of neurons — did not meet with immediate acceptance. But over time, in fits and starts, Bak’s radical argument has grown into a legitimate scientific discipline. Now, about 150 scientists worldwide investigate so-called “critical” phenomena in the brain, the topic of at least three focused workshops in 2013 alone. Add the ongoing efforts to found a journal devoted to such studies, and you have all the hallmarks of a field moving from the fringes of disciplinary boundaries to the mainstream.
continue reading..
(via Toward a Theory of Self-Organized Criticality in the Brain | Simons Foundation)

wildcat2030:

read of the day: A Fundamental Theory to Model the Mind
-
In 1999, the Danish physicist Per Bak proclaimed to a group of neuroscientists that it had taken him only 10 minutes to determine where the field had gone wrong. Perhaps the brain was less complicated than they thought, he said. Perhaps, he said, the brain worked on the same fundamental principles as a simple sand pile, in which avalanches of various sizes help keep the entire system stable overall — a process he dubbed “self-organized criticality.” As much as scientists in other fields adore outspoken, know-it-all physicists, Bak’s audacious idea — that the brain’s ordered complexity and thinking ability arise spontaneously from the disordered electrical activity of neurons — did not meet with immediate acceptance. But over time, in fits and starts, Bak’s radical argument has grown into a legitimate scientific discipline. Now, about 150 scientists worldwide investigate so-called “critical” phenomena in the brain, the topic of at least three focused workshops in 2013 alone. Add the ongoing efforts to found a journal devoted to such studies, and you have all the hallmarks of a field moving from the fringes of disciplinary boundaries to the mainstream.

continue reading..

(via Toward a Theory of Self-Organized Criticality in the Brain | Simons Foundation)

April 3, 2014

thefirstofoctember:

"A cloaking paint developed by Michigan Engineers sprays on clear and dries invisible. Once dry, it guides light around an object, causing it to become transparent.

As nanotechnology blurs the line between science and science fiction, Christoph Ellison has developed a paint that guides rays of light around an object. Still in development, the distortions allow the outline of the object to be seen, preventing true invisibility.”

Link to source

April 3, 2014

thefirstofoctember:

"A cloaking paint developed by Michigan Engineers sprays on clear and dries invisible. Once dry, it guides light around an object, causing it to become transparent.

As nanotechnology blurs the line between science and science fiction, Christoph Ellison has developed a paint that guides rays of light around an object. Still in development, the distortions allow the outline of the object to be seen, preventing true invisibility.”

Link to source

6:15pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/Zag01w1C1dZe_
  
Filed under: WATCH THIS!!! 
April 3, 2014
The Great Barrier Reef: an obituary

(Source: seriousconservation, via protoslacker)

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